austccr / bca_media_releases_scraper

Collects media releases from https://www.bca.com.au/newsroom


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Injecting configuration and compiling...  -----> Ruby app detected -----> Compiling Ruby -----> Using Ruby version: ruby-2.6.3 -----> Installing dependencies using bundler version 1.17.2  Running: bundle install --without development:test --path vendor/bundle --binstubs vendor/bundle/bin -j4 --deployment  Warning: the running version of Bundler (1.17.2) is older than the version that created the lockfile (1.17.3). We suggest you upgrade to the latest version of Bundler by running `gem install bundler`.  Fetching gem metadata from https://rubygems.org/..........  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Collecting items from https://www.strongaustralia.net/media_releases.rss Skipping http://www.strongaustralia.net/pop_up_mall_to_support_mogo_businesses, already saved Skipping http://www.strongaustralia.net/rebuilding_for_a_stronger_australia, already saved Skipping http://www.strongaustralia.net/business_community_working_to_rebuild_communities, already saved Skipping http://www.strongaustralia.net/business_community_initiatives_to_support_those_suffering, already saved Skipping http://www.strongaustralia.net/reducing_red_tape_to_power_up_australia_s_economy, already saved Skipping http://www.strongaustralia.net/skills_breakthrough_builds_a_stronger_australia, already saved Skipping http://www.strongaustralia.net/excessive_red_tape_and_unnecessary_regulation_costs_us_all, already saved Skipping http://www.strongaustralia.net/regional_communities_brimming_with_potential, already saved Skipping http://www.strongaustralia.net/tax_changes_good_for_workers_good_for_the_economy, already saved Skipping http://www.strongaustralia.net/new_investment_helping_build_a_stronger_broadmeadows, already saved Skipping http://www.strongaustralia.net/business_council_releases_a_plan_for_a_stronger_australia, already saved Skipping http://www.strongaustralia.net/strong_australia_geelong, already saved Skipping http://www.strongaustralia.net/strong_australia_toowoomba, already saved Skipping http://www.strongaustralia.net/strong_australia_busselton, already saved Skipping http://www.strongaustralia.net/broadmeadows_strong_australia_business_forum, already saved Skipping http://www.strongaustralia.net/strong_australia_launch, already saved Collecting items from https://www.bca.com.au/media_releases.rss Saving: http://www.bca.com.au/we_must_lock_in_positive_economic_data Skipping http://www.bca.com.au/wa_s_move_to_reopen_a_sensible_welcome_step, already saved Skipping http://www.bca.com.au/removing_the_roadblocks_to_recovery_and_securing_the_future, already saved Skipping http://www.bca.com.au/business_welcomes_a_reduction_in_green_tape_duplication, already saved Skipping http://www.bca.com.au/returning_to_the_cbd_and_reducing_red_tape_are_keys_to_recovery, already saved Skipping http://www.bca.com.au/_common_sense_changes_cut_red_tape_making_it_easier_to_do_business, already saved Skipping http://www.bca.com.au/reopening_to_the_world_is_a_light_at_the_end_of_the_tunnel, already saved Skipping http://www.bca.com.au/business_stands_ready_to_take_hold_of_the_baton_for_growth, already saved Skipping http://www.bca.com.au/accelerated_industry_university_research_collaboration_is_critical, already saved Skipping http://www.bca.com.au/wa_decision_is_a_national_setback, already saved Skipping http://www.bca.com.au/planning_to_live_with_covid_crucial, already saved Skipping http://www.bca.com.au/visa_changes_a_critical_step, already saved Skipping http://www.bca.com.au/step_towards_national_consistency_welcome, already saved Skipping http://www.bca.com.au/australia_uk_agreement_to_help_lock_in_our_recovery, already saved Skipping http://www.bca.com.au/transparency_key_to_good_advice, already saved Skipping http://www.bca.com.au/time_to_secure_our_economic_future, already saved Skipping http://www.bca.com.au/reopening_to_the_world_crucial_to_building_momentum, already saved Skipping http://www.bca.com.au/business_backs_call_for_reform, already saved Skipping http://www.bca.com.au/greater_industry_university_collaboration_is_critical, already saved Skipping http://www.bca.com.au/skills_and_critical_workers_will_fuel_our_recovery, already saved Collecting items from https://www.bca.com.au/submissions.rss Saving: http://www.bca.com.au/submission_on_the_social_media_anti_trolling_bill_2022 /app/vendor/bundle/ruby/2.6.0/gems/rest-client-2.0.2/lib/restclient/abstract_response.rb:223:in `exception_with_response': 404 Not Found (RestClient::NotFound) from 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name url scraped_at published_raw published author content syndication org type
Business Council releases a plan for a stronger Australia
2019-04-25 07:48:31 UTC
Thu, 11 Apr 2019 05:31:58 +1000
2019-04-10 19:31:58 UTC
Media
<p>The Business Council is today <a href="https://www.bca.com.au/a_plan_for_a_stronger_australia">releasing a plan</a> aimed at creating a more resilient Australia, with better jobs, more jobs, higher wages, lower taxes, improved living standards, and lower energy prices, Business Council chief executive Jennifer Westacott said.</p> <p>“<em>A plan for a stronger Australia </em>can deliver practical action on the concerns Australians have raised with us over the past 12 months as we’ve travelled to Adelaide, Broadmeadows, Penrith, Gladstone, Busselton, Toowoomba, Geelong, Townsville, Cairns and Hobart.</p> <p>“Australians are worried about the future. They want leadership and a vision that will allow them to get ahead.</p> <p>“They’ve told us they want action to increase their wages, lower their electricity bills and living costs, skills and training, reduced congestion in their cities, and increased opportunities in the regions.</p> <p>“Employers, just like all of our other major institutions, know we must work to rebuild trust with the community – and we are. The Australians we’ve spoken to have been clear, an anti-business, anti-growth agenda won’t deliver the jobs, higher wages and greater opportunities they want for themselves and their families. </p> <p>“Elections can either be a positive vision for the country or they can be a race to the bottom where measures are taken off the table. We are calling for a positive vision for Australians.”</p> <p><strong>The to do list:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Introduce an infrastructure planning trigger as part of a population plan. This would allow population projections to be used to better inform public infrastructure planning and investment priorities to meet demand in growing communities, instead of playing catch-up.</li> <li>Audit the strengths of regional areas, then prioritise and target infrastructure dollars into the centres with the best potential grow. New spending in the right areas means regional centres can attract employers, jobs, services and workers. We need to make the regions more attractive, and we need to take the pressure off Sydney and Melbourne.</li> <li>Urgently reform the post-secondary education and skills system. Remove the cultural and funding bias against vocational education and training by moving to a single funding model for both VET and higher education.</li> <li>Give every Australian a Lifelong Skills Account for their training and education needs through their working lives, allowing them to choose where, what and when they study.</li> <li>Maintain and strengthen the enterprise bargaining system, ensuring it works better for low-paid workers.</li> <li>Reject the straitjacket of industry-wide bargaining that limits the ability of employers and workers to adapt to technological change and prevent them from putting in place the conditions that will work for their individual workplaces.</li> <li>Grow the economy faster and encourage investment and innovation to drive productivity. Increasing wages cannot be a quick fix, cost someone else a job or force consumers to pay higher prices.</li> <li>Keep personal income taxes as low as possible so workers keep more of their own money. We support efforts to tackle bracket creep.</li> <li>Fire up investment, by lowering the rate of company tax (in stages) from 30 per cent to 25 per cent for all companies.</li> <li>Consider introducing a broad-based investment allowance that would stay in place until Australia tackles its uncompetitive tax rate for larger companies. The allowance would apply to all investments that are depreciable under current tax law, such as machinery, equipment, intangible assets and buildings.</li> <li>Get power bills down by delivering and sticking to a bipartisan long-term national energy policy. This would deliver reliable, affordable and secure energy.</li> <li>Action on climate change must strike a balance between reducing emissions while protecting jobs and living standards, especially in regional Australia. A price signal that places a value on technologies that produce lower emissions is the simplest, most efficient way to drive the investment and innovation needed to move to a lower-carbon economy.</li> <li>Increase the single rate of Newstart for those who have been on the payment for a long time and improve the ability of long term job seekers to find jobs and stay in work. We have supported increasing Newstart since 2011 because it is the right thing to do.</li> <li>Hold a Productivity Commission inquiry into entrenched disadvantage to find out why some Australians are just not getting ahead. We need to ensure people are getting the right services, and right support so, where they can, they move back into work.</li> </ul> <p>“Recent economic growth figures are a wake-up call and Australia cannot afford to be complacent.</p> <p>“We are living in fantasy land if we think our run of 28 years of uninterrupted growth will continue without taking steps to address Australia’s sluggish investment and poor productivity rates.</p> <p>“We need the economy to grow faster to deliver more for all Australians and we need a strong budget to pay for the services Australians need now and into the future.</p> <p>“One of the best ways to drive faster economic growth is to increase productivity. This means attracting more investment and innovation, so businesses can improve the way they operate; working smarter and more efficiently.</p> <p>“This has always been, is currently, and will always be the key to delivering lasting increases to wages and living standards, outside of a commodity prices boom.</p> <p>“Businesses – big and small – are made up of working people, customers, suppliers, shareholders and the communities in which they operate.</p> <p>“Businesses don’t sit on the sidelines of the economy – they are at its centre. They are people. Businesses employ 11 million of the 13 million working Australians, and are responsible for 80 per cent of all economic activity in Australia.</p> <p>“When businesses are successful, they hire more workers, pay higher wages, keep communities strong, and contribute more revenue to government coffers to pay for the schools, hospitals and services Australians need.</p> <p>“We believe it is unfair not to prepare Australia for the future, it is unfair not to give Australia the tools it needs to face the challenges of a volatile world, and it is unfair not to do everything we can to ensure Australians can get ahead.</p> <p>“Australia is a great place to live, but let’s make it even better.’’</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://d3n8a8pro7vhmx.cloudfront.net/bca/pages/352/attachments/original/1554797839/Factsheet.pdf?1554797839">Attachment<em> – thriving businesses are the backbone of the Australian economy</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://www.bca.com.au/a_plan_for_a_stronger_australia">Download - <em>A plan for a stronger Australia</em>.</a></li> </ul> <p> </p>
Business Council of Australia
Media release
WTO agreement a win for Australians
2019-04-25 07:48:33 UTC
Sat, 06 Apr 2019 15:41:40 +1100
2019-04-06 04:41:40 UTC
Media
<p>Australia’s accession to the World Trade Organisation’s Government Procurement Agreement (GPA) is a win for all Australians, Business Council chief executive Jennifer Westacott said.</p> <p>“By creating new opportunities for Australians to sell our world-class products and services, this agreement can help employers create new jobs and invest in higher wages.</p> <p>“Australia has joined 47 other nations in signing the WTO’s GPA, meaning Australians can benefit from access to new services and products and Australian businesses can sell theirs to the world.</p> <p>“The GPA guarantees Australian businesses access to international government procurement markets worth trillions of dollars, giving employers the chance to export even more of Australia’s world-class products and services.</p> <p>“Crucially, the impact of this agreement is set to grow, with room for China to sign on. This gives us a pathway to access a growing market of government contracts.</p> <p>“We welcome today’s commitment to this agreement and the strong message it sends to the world; that Australia is committed to freer and more open markets.</p> <p>“More liberal trade has helped lift millions out of poverty around the world, it helps sustain 1 in 5 Australian jobs and gives consumers the greater choices and freedom they expect.”</p>
Business Council of Australia
Media release
Budget 2019
2019-04-25 07:48:35 UTC
Tue, 02 Apr 2019 20:00:00 +1100
2019-04-02 09:00:00 UTC
Media
<p>This is a strong and responsible budget that delivers a surplus, lowers personal income taxes and invests in jobs, health, education and infrastructure, Business Council chief executive Jennifer Westacott said.</p> <p>This is the payoff for the community from spending discipline and hard work.</p> <p>Business has continued to do the heavy-lifting in this budget – which again is proof that when business thrives, Australia thrives.</p> <p>Revenues from business have underpinned the government’s ability to pay for the announcements made tonight with growing company tax collections projected to reach almost half a trillion over the next five years.</p> <p>Returning to a serious and credible surplus matters enormously to meeting the cost of the future such as the $100 billion earmarked for much needed infrastructure and sustaining high living standards.</p> <p>The personal tax cuts for low and middle-income earners will provide relief for families to meet cost of living pressures.</p> <p>We have got to keep the focus on growing the economy, so these tax cuts and spending promises can be sustained.</p> <p>As the budget itself warns, Australia cannot afford to be complacent and must better prepare for the global headwinds from a slowdown in China and domestic challenges.</p> <p>We welcome Treasurer Josh Frydenberg’s pledge to pay down the nation’s debt. Both major parties must show the discipline to actually do it. One of the single biggest items in tonight’s budget was the $11 billion net interest bill on that debt – money that could be better spent on the services Australians need and deserve.</p> <p>The Business Council has been campaigning for a lift in the status of the vocational education and training system and we welcome the government’s commitment to the VET sector and promise to establish a National Careers Institute and a National Skills Commission.</p> <p>Also welcome, is the promise to create 80,000 extra apprentices and boost literacy, numeracy and digital skills.</p> <p>The increase in the instant asset write-off for small and medium business and expanding the eligibility to claim it will help drive activity in the business community.</p> <p>However, it’s the large investment projects undertaken by big companies that creates substantial export revenue, substantial tax revenue, generate activity for thousands of small businesses and creates significant employment, particularly in regional communities.</p> <p>One of the reasons this budget is in a strong position is because it is built on decisions and investments made by our biggest companies many years ago.</p> <p>It is disappointing there is no economy-wide signal about the need to fix the investment dilemma Australia is facing with new investment as a share of GDP near 25-year lows. This must be addressed as a matter of urgency to secure the future revenue to pay for budget promises.</p> <p>The best way to sustainably lift wages growth is to drive investment to improve productivity.</p> <p>The challenge for successive governments is to stay on track with fiscal discipline, deliver on the promises to pay down debt and get serious about tackling our productivity problems by creating the environment for all parts of the economy to invest and grow.</p> <p> </p>
Business Council of Australia
Media release
Further climate policy detail welcomed
2019-04-25 07:48:37 UTC
Mon, 01 Apr 2019 16:22:00 +1100
2019-04-01 05:22:00 UTC
Dee Zegarac
<p>Australians want action on climate change, and they want a policy that delivers affordable and reliable energy, supporting industry, investment and jobs, Business Council chief executive Jennifer Westacott said.</p> <p>“We welcome the further detail provided by the Labor Party today<em>, </em>which clarifies some but not all of the unanswered questions about their climate and energy policy.”</p> <p>These include:</p> <ul> <li>What mechanism will drive and manage the transition to lower-emissions generation in the electricity sector?</li> <li>Will a disproportionate share of the national emissions reduction task fall on certain sectors of the economy given that some industries will be excluded under the Safeguard Mechanism?</li> <li>What is the reasoning behind excluding our Kyoto carry-over and not incentivising early action on climate change?</li> </ul> <p>“We are pleased to see confirmation that the Labor Party will allow access to limited international permits to help achieve its ambitious emissions reduction target and ensure businesses acquit their emissions liability at least-cost. We look forward to working with the Labor Party over the coming months to clarify the eligibility and amount of international offsets.</p> <p>“The linking of Labor’s ambitious emissions reduction target to the Safeguard Mechanism will require significant and challenging reductions for industry. In the context of uneven global commitments to reduce emissions, the Business Council emphasises the need to maintain the international competitiveness of Australia’s trade exposed sectors.</p> <p>“We welcome Labor’s acknowledgement of emissions-intensive trade-exposed (EITE) sectors in their plan and recognition that ‘tailored treatment’ will be required. The Labor Party must work closely with industry on determining facility baselines and trajectories, as well as providing greater detail on their ‘comparative impact’ principle and how this will ensure Australian businesses remain globally competitive.</p> <p>“It remains unclear how abatement will be delivered in the electricity sector and how the various announcements made today will contribute to an economy-wide emissions reduction target.</p> <p>“The Business Council has strongly supported the National Energy Guarantee and calls on the Labor Party, if elected, to commit to working with the states and territories to implement the scheme as a credible, market-based mechanism to drive abatement and investment in the electricity sector. It is essential that the electricity sector has the ability to generate domestic offsets that can be accessed under the Safeguard Mechanism to offset liabilities and assist with equalising marginal abatement across sectors.</p> <p>“The decision not to utilise Kyoto carry-over credits is concerning. Recent modelling has demonstrated that this will have a significant impact on the rate of economic growth and ultimately the size of our economy. We strongly encourage the Labor Party to re-examine this decision in the coming weeks and call on them to undertake and release Treasury or Productivity Commission modelling of their emissions reduction target if they form government at the next election to further inform the debate.</p> <p>“The Business Council supports a greater focus on abatement in the transport sector. It is important that all sectors of the economy contribute to reducing our emissions and that no sector carries the burden alone. We encourage the Labor Party to consult closely with industry on the introduction, coverage and timeframe for any new standards.</p> <p>“Climate and energy policies will have significant impacts on our regions, on jobs and future economic growth. It is vital that political leaders are transparent with the public about the likely cost and impact of their policies. Maintaining investment confidence, a predictable policy landscape and least-cost abatement must remain key objectives for the all sides of politics when designing energy and climate change policies.</p> <p>“Getting the delicate balance right between reducing emissions and promoting economic growth is best served by an economy-wide, bipartisan price signal to drive technological change. In the long-term, this should be linked to the global carbon price, rather than a sector-by-sector approach.”</p>
Business Council of Australia
Media release
Commitment to independent wages system welcomed
2019-04-25 07:48:38 UTC
Tue, 26 Mar 2019 12:13:54 +1100
2019-03-26 01:13:54 UTC
Media
<p>Labor’s announcement today that it will maintain an independent minimum wage system is welcome, Business Council chief executive Jennifer Westacott said.</p> <p>“Full-time workers deserve a wage that allows them to support themselves, they also need the jobs that only thriving businesses can create. An independent umpire is the best way to balance these demands.</p> <p>“An independent commission with broader terms of reference alongside a thorough review to determine a living wage are sensible steps. Employers also welcome Labor’s commitment to considering the tax and transfer system in any future determinations.</p> <p>“The Business Council has long supported the Productivity Commission’s recommendation that the Fair Work Commission broaden its framework for determining minimum wage increases while also considering the impact that any increase may have on the labour market and the economy more broadly.   </p> <p>“Businesses employ 11 million of the 13 million working Australians, their capacity to pay for increasing wages must be considered carefully in any decision. Announcements today are a good step towards workable reform that ensures all voices are heard and that the enterprise bargaining system remains central to Australia’s workplace relations system.</p> <p>“The Opposition has listened to employers concerns, ensuring that any increase in the minimum wage is phased in over time. Clearly it is Labor’s intention to target the lowest paid workers by announcing that changes would not flow through to workers on awards or enterprise bargaining agreements, it will be important to see exactly how this mechanism works.</p> <p>“Higher wages for low paid workers are a good aspiration but Australia needs a national plan to boost wages across the economy. That should start with a strategy to attract investment and supercharge the real driver of wages, productivity growth.</p> <p>“A minimum wage increase is not a panacea for disadvantaged Australians. Political leaders should act to tackle entrenched disadvantage through a Productivity Commission inquiry to better target resources to those who need them and by increasing the inadequate Newstart allowance for single people.”</p>
Business Council of Australia
Media release
Planning for growth can boost our regions
2019-04-25 07:48:40 UTC
Wed, 20 Mar 2019 15:29:38 +1100
2019-03-20 04:29:38 UTC
Media
<p class="BCAText"><span style="font-size: 12.0pt;">A focus on our regions and vital infrastructure are welcome additions to Australia’s population debate, Business Council chief executive Jennifer Westacott said. </span></p> <p class="BCAText"><span style="font-size: 12.0pt;">“Australia needs a strategic population plan that doesn’t just talk about the number of skilled migrants arriving but tackles the issue of growth in the regions. Today’s announcements are a step in the right direction.</span></p> <p class="BCAText"><span style="font-size: 12.0pt;">“While Australians in our major cities are frustrated by congestion, those in our regions have told us they need more people, skills, jobs and investment.</span></p> <p class="BCAText"><span style="font-size: 12.0pt;">“Australian cities need to be better places to live and we need to encourage growth in our regional centres. </span></p> <p class="BCAText"><span style="font-size: 12.0pt;">“New infrastructure and the right incentives to attract migrants to the regions can improve the quality of life for people in our congested cities and open up opportunities for people in our regions.</span></p> <p class="BCAText"><span style="font-size: 12.0pt;">“We welcome recent moves to better co-ordinate growth across the country and between the states and the federal government, these commitments must continue so regions get the new skills they need to keep growing. </span></p> <p class="BCAText"><span style="font-size: 12.0pt;">“Well managed skilled migration contributes to a growing and stronger economy. It is important that the migration program continues to prioritise skilled migration and retains a strong employer-nominated program, which is particularly important for filling positions experiencing skill shortages quickly.</span></p> <p class="BCAText"><span style="font-size: 12.0pt;">“Migration has been such a success story for the country.</span></p> <p class="BCAText"><span style="font-size: 12.0pt;">“We do not have the social cohesion issues other countries face. Skilled migration, temporary and permanent, has brought technology transfer, it has brought people to the regions, it has brought the capacity to deliver on huge projects, and it has brought a diversity of culture and people.</span></p> <p class="BCAText"><span style="font-size: 12.0pt;">“Any changes to our immigration intake need to be regularly reviewed to make sure we are delivering Australia’s long-term economic goals and they do not lock in poorer budget outcomes and lower economic growth.” </span></p>
Business Council of Australia
Media release
Business welcomes employment services reform
2019-04-25 07:48:42 UTC
Wed, 20 Mar 2019 12:19:53 +1100
2019-03-20 01:19:53 UTC
Media
<p>Employers welcome the government’s announcement that it will reform the employment services system to give disadvantaged job seekers the best chance to find work, Business Council chief executive Jennifer Westacott said.</p> <p>“We know the system can do much better for disadvantaged job seekers and to help employers source the talent and skills they need, and this package is a step in the right direction.</p> <p>“For most people a job is the best path to a dignified and purposeful life. Disadvantaged job seekers require the most support and it makes sense for the government to dedicate more resources and personalised support to them.   </p> <p>“Reforming the important principle of mutual obligation will help deliver greater flexibility for job seekers, with greater scope to find the jobs that suit their individual circumstances. The Business Council will also continue working with the government to ensure that employment services have a strong focus on literacy and numeracy training for those who do not meet the minimum standard. </p> <p>“Pilot sites in Adelaide South and the Mid North Coast of New South Wales will be a good opportunity to work through the detail and test new components of the reform.</p> <p>“Business is ready to work with government on improving employment services to ensure they can find the right candidates and to give as many people as possible the dignity and economic freedom only a job can provide.”</p>
Business Council of Australia
Media release
Common sense decision will help protect jobs
2019-04-25 07:48:44 UTC
Fri, 15 Mar 2019 11:03:30 +1100
2019-03-15 00:03:30 UTC
Media
<p>Yesterday’s decision by the Western Australian Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) to withdraw their reckless carbon emissions guidelines will help protect jobs and investment, Business Council chief executive Jennifer Westacott said.</p> <p>“We congratulate the McGowan government for acting quickly following the release of the EPA guidelines last week. The EPA has made the right decision in shelving the guidelines, ensuring that jobs are not put at risk by a poor and rushed policy process.</p> <p>“Reducing our carbon emissions should be done as part of a national and co-ordinated approach rather than through state-based and ad-hoc regulation, we look forward to working to ensure this is the case in the future.</p> <p>“We welcome the opportunity for proper consultation, ensuring that business, who employ 11 million of the 13 million working Australians, can help design guidelines which do not stall much needed investment.</p> <p>“More ad hoc regulation would have undermined the competitiveness of Australian businesses, forcing them to compete with one hand tied behind their backs. Getting these regulations right is essential if employers are going to keep investing in new jobs and higher wages, as well as improving the efficiency of our carbon footprint.”</p>
Business Council of Australia
Media release
Business welcomes sensible changes to skilled visas
2019-04-25 07:48:46 UTC
Fri, 08 Mar 2019 17:16:11 +1100
2019-03-08 06:16:11 UTC
Media
<p>The economy will receive a welcome boost from changes that give businesses with proven track records of investing in the Australian economy faster access to the skills they need, Business Council chief executive Jennifer Westacott said.</p> <p>“We welcome faster access to temporary skilled visas for businesses that have proven that they are compliant and have a genuine shortage to fill. Filling shortages quickly gives businesses the ability to continue growing, investing and creating new Australian jobs.</p> <p>“Changes to expand the list of accredited employers and reduce visa processing times are particularly welcome, as are moves to ensure that businesses eligible to apply are aware of the scheme. We thank the government for listening to businesses concerns.</p> <p>“Skilled migrants are good for business and good for our wider economy – they help create the conditions for higher wages and a growing economy for all Australians.</p> <p>“Our members prefer to employ Australian workers when they are available, changes today will help provide companies with the flexibility they need to continue growing and evolving where there is a genuine need for specialised skills.”</p>
Business Council of Australia
Media release
Supplier payment code now covering more than half a trillion in revenue
2019-04-25 07:48:48 UTC
Fri, 08 Mar 2019 15:04:00 +1100
2019-03-08 04:04:00 UTC
Dee Zegarac
<p>The Business Council’s supplier payment code now covers more than half a trillion dollars’ worth of revenue with some of the biggest players at the centre of Australia’s most important supply chains underscoring their long held commitment to small business partners by signing up.</p> <p>Recent signatories to the code include Scentre Group, owner and operator of Westfield in Australia and New Zealand, Woolworths, Coles, Kmart and Target. Energy players Origin, EnergyAustralia and AGL are members of the code along with the nation’s resource giants BHP, Rio Tinto, Woodside and FMG. Food and beverage manufacturers Coca-Cola Amatil, Lion, Nestle, and Mars Australia have also made the commitment to their small suppliers.  </p> <p>The code requires all signatories to pay small business suppliers within 30 days and to work with small businesses to improve invoicing and payments systems, such as through greater adoption of electronic trading, Business Council chief executive Jennifer Westacott said.</p> <p>“We launched the code with the Council of Small Business Organisations of Australia  and Victorian Government in 2017 because we know that businesses of all sizes depend on each other to thrive. We heard community concerns about small business payment times, and we are acting to make sure they get a fair go.</p> <p>“Since its launch the code has grown to cover some of Australia’s biggest companies with thousands of small business suppliers, helping smaller businesses grow with their larger partners.”</p> <p>The Business Council is today releasing former ACCC chair Graeme Samuel’s independent review of the code, which found that the code can work for small businesses and that there is no reason that governments and large businesses can’t sign up now.</p> <p>The review made a number of recommendations to address issues raised in the expert panel’s consultation process and promote greater adoption of the code. All recommendations have been adopted.</p> <p>“With the recommendations of the independent review now fully adopted the code can continue to give small businesses the certainty they need to plan, grow, invest and employ more working Australians,” Ms Westacott said.   </p> <p>A copy of the review, the signatories to the code and more information is available at the dedicated website, <a href="http://www.supplierpaymentcode.org.au">www.supplierpaymentcode.org.au</a></p>
Business Council of Australia
Media release

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